Cheap Travel Insurance For People Who've Had A Heart Attack

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If you’ve had a heart attack at anytime in your life you must take travel insurance and declare the heart attack when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment. The cost of receiving medical treatment away from the UK can be very high. For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people who've had a heart attack).

Travellers with a history of a heart attack have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with a history of heart attack, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

For example, a 54 year old male, travelling to the United States of America for 1 week would pay around £13.42 if they didn’t have heart attack, but for the same person with heart attack, the premium could be £36.41, that’s around 3 times more expensive.

Typically customers with a heart attack might also suffer with another condition. In our example the premium would still be £36.41 assuming the applicant was taking 2 additional medications for high blood pressure.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and whether you smoke.

Heart attack and travel insurance

Myocardial infarction or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the medical term for an event commonly known as a heart attack. It happens when blood stops flowing properly to part of the heart and the heart muscle is injured due to not receiving enough oxygen. Usually this is because one of the coronary arteries that supplies blood to the heart develops a blockage due to an unstable buildup of white blood cells, cholesterol and fat. The event is called "acute" if it is sudden and serious.

A person having an acute myocardial infarction usually has sudden chest pain that is felt behind the breast bone and sometimes travels to the left arm or the left side of the neck. Additionally, the person may have shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heartbeats, and anxiety. Women experience fewer of these symptoms than men, but usually have shortness of breath, weakness, a feeling of indigestion, and fatigue. In many cases, in some estimates as high as 64 percent, the person does not have chest pain or other symptoms. These are called "silent" myocardial infarctions.

Important risk factors are previous cardiovascular disease, old age, tobacco smoking, high blood levels of certain lipids (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides) and low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, lack of physical activity, obesity, chronic kidney disease, excessive alcohol consumption, the use of cocaine and amphetamines, and chronic high stress levels. The two main ways to determine if a person has had a myocardial infarction are electrocardiograms (ECGs) that trace the electrical signals in the heart and testing the blood for substances associated with damage to the heart muscle.

There are a number of different classifications for heart attack and these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with heart attack.

And finally, those that are awaiting a diagnosis or additional tests face the heftiest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.